Blog

 

Keep Your Pet Cool This Summer

 

With the arrival of summer, you may have noticed the hot temperatures. This means less clothes, more water, and more exhaustion for you. But your pet also faces the same environmental factors that you do. Sure, many living things can adapt or cope with uncomfortable conditions; but there comes a point when the temperatures and air quality can be dangerous for you and your pets. Becoming overheated in the dog-days of summer is extremely common among pets, but as their owner and companion, you can and should help provide relief.

 

What are the signs?

 

Dogs specifically, show these outward signs of distress:

•    Excessive thirst and drooling

•    Increased body temperature

•    Non-stop panting, rapid breathing

•    Confusion or attitude shift

•    Fast heartbeat

•    Slower pace than usual, or refusal to continue walking

 

If the body temperature is severely elevated, dogs may show these signs:

•    Completely collapse

•    Vomiting

•    Bright red or blue mucus/gums

•    Bruises or marks appear on their body

•    Diarrhea

•    Seizures

 

Prevent heat-related health issues

 

The best method for preventing heat-related disease is obvious - avoid situations in which your pet may become overheated. When it’s too humid, or the air quality is poor it may be best to limit exercise to evenings or early mornings. Also, something we must remember is to never leave your pet in a parked car for any amount of time. The inside of a car heats up very fast, even in fair conditions. Know your pet! The breed of your pet, age, and their body size and shape are good indicators of how they adapt to and self-cool their selves in higher temperatures. These are all important to think about in order to reduce the chances of heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and death.

 

Overheated? Find some relief!

 

These are some of the signs:

-    Head for the shade, inside, or use a fan or a/c unit to cool your pet

-    Give it a rest!

-    Provide water to drink frequently in small amounts

-    If you are able, let your dog jump into a fresh body of water or pool, this can help reduce the overheating

 

The summer is coming and we all want to enjoy getting outside with our family, friends, and pets. When you go out, be aware and be proactive to protect your loved ones in the heat!

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With the arrival of summer, you may have noticed the hot temperatures. This means less clothes, more water, and more exhaustion for you. But your pet also faces the same environmental factors that you do. Sure, many living things can adapt or cope with uncomfortable conditions; but there comes a point when the temperatures and air quality can be dangerous for you and your pets. Becoming overheated in the dog-days of summer is extremely common among pets, but as their owner and companion, you can and should help provide relief.

 

What are the signs?

 

Dogs specifically, show these outward signs of distress:

•    Excessive thirst and drooling

•    Increased body temperature

•    Non-stop panting, rapid breathing

•    Confusion or attitude shift

•    Fast heartbeat

•    Slower pace than usual, or refusal to continue walking

 

If the body temperature is severely elevated, dogs may show these signs:

•    Completely collapse

•    Vomiting

•    Bright red or blue mucus/gums

•    Bruises or marks appear on their body

•    Diarrhea

•    Seizures

 

Prevent heat-related health issues

 

The best method for preventing heat-related disease is obvious - avoid situations in which your pet may become overheated. When it’s too humid, or the air quality is poor it may be best to limit exercise to evenings or early mornings. Also, something we must remember is to never leave your pet in a parked car for any amount of time. The inside of a car heats up very fast, even in fair conditions. Know your pet! The breed of your pet, age, and their body size and shape are good indicators of how they adapt to and self-cool their selves in higher temperatures. These are all important to think about in order to reduce the chances of heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and death.

 

Overheated? Find some relief!

 

These are some of the signs:

-    Head for the shade, inside, or use a fan or a/c unit to cool your pet

-    Give it a rest!

-    Provide water to drink frequently in small amounts

-    If you are able, let your dog jump into a fresh body of water or pool, this can help reduce the overheating

 

The summer is coming and we all want to enjoy getting outside with our family, friends, and pets. When you go out, be aware and be proactive to protect your loved ones in the heat!